The History of the Porterhouse Steak | Hometown Meat
The History of the Porterhouse Steak
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The history of the term “porterhouse steak” is remarkably controversial, as a variety of cities and restaurants claim to have created it. The label might have originated on Manhattan’s Pearl Street approximately 1814, when porter house owner Martin Morrison started serving particularly large T-bones. The Oxford English Dictionary notes this etymology as the most likely origin of the steak’s name while noting that there’s no present-day evidence to support or contradict the story.

A Steak By Any Other Name

This origin account gained traction in the late 19th century, but other carnivores contend a Cambridge, Mass. lodging and restaurant proprietor named Zachariah B. Porter provided his name to the cut. Even so others claim that the steak takes its name directly from the Porter House, a popular 19th-century hotel in Flowery Branch, Ga.

The Porterhouse Steak Cut

The T-bone as well as porterhouse are actually steaks regarding beef cut starting with the short loin. Both meats include a “T”-shaped bone with meat on each side. Porterhouse steaks are cut from the rear end of the short loin and thus include more tenderloin steak, in conjunction with (on the other side of the bone) a large strip steak. T-bone steaks are trimmed closer to the front, and consist of a smaller section of tenderloin. The smaller sized portion of a T-bone, when sold alone, at Hometown Meat, is referred to as a free range filet steak, specifically if cut directly from the small forward end of the tenderloin.

Our Monstrous Porterhouse Steak

Take a look at our monstrous 24oz Porterhouse Steak inside our large meat subscription box. It’s truly one of a kind. Meat. Yum.

Summary
The History of the Porterhouse Steak
Article Name
The History of the Porterhouse Steak
Description
The history of the porterhouse steak is up for contention! Here's a quick history of the name.

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